Open Heart Church of the Nazarene

What is the Church of the Nazarene?

Welcome to OPEN HEART Church of the Nazarene   

We are located at 669 Village Way in the Bigfoot subdivision on the corner of Village way and Forest View.

Services start at 11am on Sundays

We are a house church that patterns itself after the 1st century churches with keeping to the teaching of the Apostles, sharing a meal, and fellowship, worship, and the Lord's Supper.

Our goal is to make disciples of Jesus and to minister to those who are Christians but are not going to a church.

Contact us at 707-599-1969  for more info.

Vision: A Place of Hope in the midst of Chaos

 

In a chaotic World our Church is a place of spiritual refuge. Everybody is welcome to come and grow in Christ, no matter where they are on their spiritual journey.

 

Mission: Our mission is to become that place of spiritual refuge by following Acts 2:42 – And they devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.” 

 

Core Values: Our focus as a congregation is in corporate worship where we accept all as they are, pray for each other, hear God’s Word, and are equipped to go out in service and compassion.

 

1. Acceptance: We accept all who come here at Open Heart Nazarene Church according to the admonition of God’s Word in Matthew 7:1 “Judge not, that you may not be judged.”

 

2. Love of God’s Word: Psalm 119:105 “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, And light unto my path.” The word of God directs us in our work and way, and a dark place indeed the world would be without it. The commandment is a lamp kept burning with the oil of the Spirit, as a light to direct us in the choice of our way, and the steps we take in that way.

 

3. Compassion: Having love for God’s people as Jesus wept over Jerusalem.

 

Colossians 3:12-14

Put on therefore, as God's elect, holy and beloved, a heart of compassion,  kindness, lowliness, meekness, longsuffering; forbearing one another, and forgiving each other, if any man have a complaint against any; even as the Lord forgave you, so also do ye: and above all these things [put on] love, which is the bond of perfectness.

 

1st John 3:16-18

By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us; and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. But if any one has the world's goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God's love abide in him? Little children, let us not love in word or speech but in deed and in truth.

 


4. Service: Our service to God's people is to help those in need, as being a faithful servant of our Lord Jesus. 

Matthew 25:23

“His lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant: thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will set thee over many things; enter thou into the joy of thy lord.”

Mark 10:44

“and whosoever would be first among you, shall be servant of all.”

 

Eph 2:10

For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

Romans 12:9-13Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with brotherly affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Never flag in zeal, be aglow with the Spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in your hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints, practice hospitality.

 

About our Denomination:

  The Church of the Nazarene is a Protestant Christian church in the Wesleyan-Holiness tradition, tracing its roots to an anniversary date of 1908. It was founded to spread the message of scriptural holiness (Christlike living) across the lands. Today the Church of the Nazarene is located in 156 world areas. 


The Church of the Nazarene is a Great Commission church. Our mission is to make Christlike disciples in the nations. We believe that God offers to everyone forgiveness, peace, joy, purpose, love, meaning in life, and the promise of heaven when life is over by entering and experiencing a personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ. We are called to take this message to people everywhere.

The Church of the Nazarene is also a holiness church. We believe that Christians can experience a deeper level of life in which there is victory over sin, power to witness and serve, and a richer fellowship with God, all through the infilling of the Holy Spirit.

Through these links on the left, you can learn more about the mission, history, purpose, basic beliefs, Articles of Faith, and core values of the Church of the Nazarene.

With over 26,000 congregations, our vision and mission embraces the entire world. Each local congregation of the Church of the Nazarene is a faith community ready to greet you in Jesus' name. There you will discover opportunities not only to encounter Jesus as your Savior and Lord but also to grow as a follower of Christ. Local churches offer worship, opportunities for serving others, fellowship, and training. We invite you to experience the unique fellowship here at Willow Creek Church of the Nazarene.

History of the Church of the Nazarene

The Church of the Nazarene traces its anniversary date to 1908. Its organization was a marriage that, like every marriage, linked existing families and created a new one. As an expression of the holiness movement and its emphasis on the sanctified life, our founders came together to form one people. Utilizing evangelism, compassionate ministries, and education, their church went forth to become a people of many cultures and tongues.

Two central themes illuminate the Nazarene story.

The first is "unity in holiness."

The spiritual vision of early Nazarenes was derived from the doctrinal core of John Wesley's preaching. These affirmations include justification by grace through faith, sanctification likewise by grace through faith, entire sanctification as an inheritance available to every Christian, and the witness of the Spirit to God's work in human lives. The holiness movement arose in the 1830s to promote these doctrines, especially entire sanctification. By 1900, however, the movement had splintered.

P. F. Bresee, C. B. Jernigan, C. W. Ruth, and other committed leaders strove to unite holiness factions. The First and Second General Assemblies were like two bookends:

In October 1907, the Association of Pentecostal Churches of America and the Church of the Nazarene merged in Chicago, Illinois, at the First General Assembly.
In April 1908, a congregation organized in Peniel, Texas, drew into the Nazarene movement the key officers of the Holiness Association of Texas.

The Pennsylvania Conference of the Holiness Christian Church united in September 1908.


In October 1908, the Second General Assembly was held at Pilot Point, Texas, the headquarters of the Holiness Church of Christ. The "year of uniting" ended with the merger of this southern denomination with its northern counterpart.

With the Pentecostal Church of Scotland and Pentecostal Mission unions in 1915, the Church of the Nazarene embraced seven previous denominations and parts of two other groups.1 The Nazarenes and the Wesleyan Church emerged as the two denominations that eventually drew together a majority of the holiness movement's independent strands.

"A mission to the world" is the second primary theme in the Nazarene story.

In 1908 there were churches in Canada and organized work in India, Cape Verde, and Japan, soon followed by work in Africa, Mexico, and China. The 1915 mergers added congregations in the British Isles and work in Cuba, Central America, and South America. There were congregations in Syria and Palestine by 1922. As General Superintendent H. F. Reynolds advocated "a mission to the world," support for world evangelization became a distinguishing characteristic of Nazarene life. New technologies were utilized. The church began producing the " Showers of Blessing " radio program in the 1940s, followed by the Spanish broadcast " La Hora Nazarena " and later by broadcasts in other languages. Indigenous holiness churches in Australia and Italy united in the 1940s, others in Canada and Great Britain in the 1950s, and one in Nigeria in 1988.

As the church grew culturally and linguistically diverse, it committed itself in 1980 to internationalization-a deliberate policy of being one church of congregations and districts worldwide, rather than splitting into national churches like earlier Protestant denominations. By the 2001 General Assembly, 42 percent of delegates spoke English as their second language or did not speak it at all. Today 65 percent of Nazarenes and over 80 percent of the church's 439 districts are outside the United States. An early system of colleges in North America and the  British Isles has become a global network of  institutions. Nazarenes  support 14 liberal arts institutions in Africa, Brazil,  Canada, Caribbean,  Korea, and the United States, as well as 5 graduate seminaries, 31  undergraduate Bible/theological colleges, 2 nurses training  colleges, and  1 education college worldwide.


For more information on the history of the Church of the Nazarene,

            visit: http://www.nazarene.org/

1The seven denominations were: the Central Evangelical Holiness Association (New England), the Association of Pentecostal Churches of America (Middle Atlantic States), New Testament Church of Christ (South), Independent Holiness Church (Southwest), the Church of the Nazarene (West Coast), the Pentecostal Church of Scotland, and the Pentecostal Mission (Southeast). Several mergers occurred regionally before regional churches, in turn, united together in 1907 and 1908.

 

Upcoming Events

Sunday, Aug 21 at 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Sunday, Aug 28 at 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Sunday, Sep 4 at 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Sunday, Sep 11 at 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM