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The Empty Tomb

Posted by [email protected] on April 1, 2021 at 11:05 PM Comments comments (681)

The Empty Tomb

John 20:1-18

OPEN:

After you bury someone you love, how do you deal with your grief?

Do you find comfort in going out to the cemetery?

Why?

20:1-9

1 Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance.

2 So she came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one Jesus loved, and said, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we don’t know where they have put him!”

3 So Peter and the other disciple started for the tomb.

4 Both were running, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first.

5 He bent over and looked in at the strips of linen lying there but did not go in.

6 Then Simon Peter came along behind him and went straight into the tomb. He saw the strips of linen lying there, 7 as well as the cloth that had been wrapped around Jesus’ head. The cloth was still lying in its place, separate from the linen.

8 Finally the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went inside. He saw and believed.

9 (They still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead.)

 

DIG:

 

What would be Mary’s emotional state two days after the Cross, after she saw the torturous death of Jesus?

 

Would you be sleepless?

 

Why would you visit the tomb so early in the morning?

 

How do you react finding the body gone?

What does the other disciple (John) believe? Why?

Jesus Appears to Mary Magdalene

20:10-18

10 Then the disciples went back to where they were staying.

11 Now Mary stood outside the tomb crying. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb 12 and saw two angels in white, seated where Jesus’ body had been, one at the head and the other at the foot.

13 They asked her, “Woman, why are you crying?” “They have taken my Lord away,” she said, “and I don’t know where they have put him.”

14 At this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not realize that it was Jesus.

15 He asked her, “Woman, why are you crying? Who is it you are looking for?” Thinking he was the gardener, she said, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him.”

16 Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means “Teacher”).

17 Jesus said, “Do not hold on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father. Go instead to my brothers and tell them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’ ”

18 Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: “I have seen the Lord!” And she told them that he had said these things to her.

 

So….when did Mary get back to the tomb?

 

Think maybe the disciples ran faster than she did?

 

Why was Mary crying?

 

Would you have responded more like Mary or the Disciples?

 

Was Mary quietly grieving or more hysterical?

 

What finally breaks thru her grief and confusion?

 

How does her return to the disciples here contrast to that in verse 2?

2 … “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we don’t know where they have put him!”

18… I have seen the Lord!

What term does Jesus use for the disciples here? {My Brothers}

 

How does this relate to what he said in 15:15?

 

15 I no longer call you servants, because a servant does not know his master’s business. Instead, I have called you friends, for everything that I learned from my Father I have made known to you.

 

What is new in their relationship from now on?

 

REFLECT:

 

When you bury someone you dearly love, how does the fact of the resurrection of Jesus from the dead help you to deal with your own pain?

 

What do you rely on for evidence that Jesus is the Son of God and that he rose from the dead?

 

How did you feel after your beloved friend or family died?

 

Did God help you in this feeling of grief?

 

Mary Magdalene, out of whom He had cast seven demons, appears first in the scene-a touching expression of the ways of God. She represents, I doubt not, the Jewish remnant of that day, personally attached to the Lord, but not knowing the power of resurrection. She is alone in her love: the very strength of her affection isolates her. She was not the only one saved, but she comes alone to seek-wrongly to seek, if you will, but to seek-Jesus, before the testimony of His glory shines forth in a world of darkness, because she loved Himself. She comes before the other women, while it was yet dark. It is a loving heart (we have already seen it in the believing women) occupied with Jesus, when the public testimony of man is still entirely wanting. And it is to this that Jesus first manifests Himself when He is risen. Nevertheless, her heart knew where it would find a response. She goes away to Peter and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, when she does not find the body of Christ. Peter and the other disciple go, and find the proofs of a resurrection accomplished (as to Jesus Himself) with all the composure that became the power of God, great as the alarm might be that it created in the mind of man. There had been no haste; everything was in order: and Jesus was not there.

The two disciples, however, are not moved by the same attachment as that which filled her heart, who had been the object of so mighty a deliverance on the Lord's part. They see, and, on these visible proofs, they believe. It was not a spiritual understanding of the thoughts of God by means of His word; they saw and believed. There is nothing in this which gathers the disciples together. Jesus was away; He had risen. They had satisfied themselves on this point, and they go away to their home. But Mary, led by affection rather than by intelligence, is not satisfied with coldly recognizing that Jesus was again risen. She thought Him still dead, because she did not possess Him.

His death, the fact of her not finding Him again, added to the intensity of her affection, because He Himself was its object. All the tokens of this affection are produced here in the most touching manner. She supposes that the gardener must know who was in question without her telling him, for she only thought of one (as if I inquired of a beloved object in a family, "How is he?"). Bending over the sepulchre, she turns her head when He approaches; but then the Good Shepherd, risen from the dead, calls His sheep by her name; and the known and loved voice-mighty according to the grace which thus called her-instantly reveals Him to her who heard it. She turns to Him, and replies, "Rabboni-my Master."

But while thus revealing Himself to the beloved remnant, whom He had delivered, all is changed in their position and in His relationship with them. He was not going now to dwell bodily in the midst of His people on earth. He did not come back to re-establish the kingdom in Israel. "Touch me not," says He to Mary. But by redemption He had wrought a far more important thing. He had placed them in the same position as Himself with His Father and His God; and He calls them-which He never had, and never could have done before-His brethren. Until His death the corn of wheat remained alone. Pure and perfect, the Son of God, He could not stand in the same relationship to God as the sinner; but, in the glorious position which He was going to resume as man, He could, through redemption, associate with Himself His redeemed ones, cleansed, regenerated, and adopted in Him.

That is us this day.

We have been bought with a price, and redeemed, cleansed and regenerated, adopted into the family of God.

Amen!

 

 

 

Jesus Washes His Disciples Feet

Posted by [email protected] on March 25, 2021 at 11:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Jesus Washes His Disciples Feet

John 13:1-17

OPEN:

If you knew it was the last night with those you dearly love, how would you spend it?

Who would you nominate for the Mother Teresa award in your family or church fro selfless Christ-like love?

1 It was just before the Passover Festival. Jesus knew that the hour had come for him to leave this world and go to the Father. Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.

2 The evening meal was in progress, and the devil had already prompted Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot, to betray Jesus.

3 Jesus knew that the Father had put all things under his power, and that he had come from God and was returning to God; 4 so he got up from the meal, took off his outer clothing, and wrapped a towel around his waist.

5 After that, he poured water into a basin and began to wash his disciples’ feet, drying them with the towel that was wrapped around him.

6 He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet?”

7 Jesus replied, “You do not realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand.”

8 “No,” said Peter, “you shall never wash my feet.” Jesus answered, “Unless I wash you, you have no part with me.”

9 “Then, Lord,” Simon Peter replied, “not just my feet but my hands and my head as well!”

10 Jesus answered, “Those who have had a bath need only to wash their feet; their whole body is clean. And you are clean, though not every one of you.”

11 For he knew who was going to betray him, and that was why he said not every one was clean.

12 When he had finished washing their feet, he put on his clothes and returned to his place. “Do you understand what I have done for you?” he asked them.

13 “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am.

14 Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. 15 I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you.

16 Very truly I tell you, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. 17 Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them.

 

DIG:

From Verses 1, 3 & 11, what things did Jesus know?

In light of that knowledge, what is especially impressive about vs. 4-5?

4 so he got up from the meal, took off his outer clothing, and wrapped a towel around his waist. 5 After that, he poured water into a basin and began to wash his disciples’ feet, drying them with the towel that was wrapped around him.

 

Realizing that this duty was normally performed by the lowest ranking servant in a household, what does this action demonstrate?

 

If you were Peter, would you have reacted as he did?

 

Why or why not?

 

While Peter was thinking of Jesus literally washing his feet, what do you think Jesus meant in vs. 8 & 10?

        8 “No,” said Peter, “you shall never wash my feet.” Jesus answered, “Unless I wash you, you                    have no part with me.”

 

      10 Jesus answered, “Those who have had a bath need only to wash their feet; their whole body is             clean. And you are clean, though not every one of you.”

 

What new meaning would these statements take on for the disciples after Jesus’ betrayal, arrest, death & resurrection?

From vs 12-17, what was the point Jesus wanted his disciples to learn?

        12 When he had finished washing their feet, he put on his clothes and returned to his place. “Do               you understand what I have done for you?” he asked them.

        13 “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am.

        14 Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one                           another’s feet. 15 I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you.

        16 Very truly I tell you, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the               one who sent him. 17 Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them.

 

How would this challenge their idea of what it means to be the chief followers of the Messiah?

REFLECT:

In your early spiritual life, who was one of the people that demonstrated to you what it means to “wash feet”?

Have you ever thanked this person?

Is there somebody you know that needs a loving touch from you?

Is it possible to do for others, or to give to others, what one has not first experienced or received for oneself?

When it comes to foot washing and other acts of humility and service, do you find it easier to serve others “hand & foot”, or to have your own needs slavishly attended to?

Our Lord Jesus has a people in the world that are his own; he has purchased them, and paid dear for them, and he has set them apart for himself; they devote themselves to him as a peculiar people. Those whom Christ loves, he loves to the end. Nothing can separate a true believer from the love of Christ. We know not when our hour will come, therefore what we have to do in constant preparation for it, ought never to be undone.

Jesus washed his disciples' feet, that he might teach us to think nothing below us, wherein we may promote God's glory, and the good of our brethren. We must address ourselves to duty, and must lay aside everything that would hinder us in what we have to do. Christ washed his disciples' feet, that he might signify to them the value of spiritual washing, and the cleansing of the soul from the pollutions of sin. Our Lord Jesus does many things of which even his own disciples do not for the present know the meaning, but they shall know afterward. We see in the end what was the kindness from events which seemed most cross. And it is not humility, but unbelief, to put away the offers of the gospel, as if too rich to be made to us, or too good news to be true. All those, and those only, who are spiritually washed by Christ, have a part in Christ. All whom Christ owns and saves, he justifies and sanctifies.

Let us be found in Jesus this day. Amen!!!

 

Did Jesus eat the Passover lamb at the Last Supper?

Posted by [email protected] on March 20, 2021 at 11:55 PM Comments comments (0)

In 2007, Pope Benedict XV announced that there would have been no lamb served at the Last Supper. The then-pope theorized that the Last Supper took place before the ritual sacrifice of the lambs, which was a common Passover tradition in Jesus's time, and therefore it was Jesus himself who took the lambs' place.

The Passover

Posted by [email protected] on March 20, 2021 at 11:45 PM Comments comments (0)

The Passover

Exodus 12:1-30

OPEN:

Where do you fall in the birth order if your family?

What great expectations and special privileges fell to the oldest?

To the Youngest?

What was allowed & allotted to you?

Imagine yourself planning a meal for 1,000 people on a two-week notice.

The crowd would eat & run. What do you serve?

When it’s “Just family”, what’s the biggest spread of the year your parents put on the table?

1 The LORD said to Moses and Aaron in Egypt,

2 “This month is to be for you the first month, the first month of your year.

3 Tell the whole community of Israel that on the tenth day of this month each man is to take a lamb for his family, one for each household.

4 If any household is too small for a whole lamb, they must share one with their nearest neighbor, having taken into account the number of people there are. You are to determine the amount of lamb needed in accordance with what each person will eat.

5 The animals you choose must be year-old males without defect, and you may take them from the sheep or the goats.

6 Take care of them until the fourteenth day of the month, when all the members of the community of Israel must slaughter them at twilight.

7 Then they are to take some of the blood and put it on the sides and tops of the doorframes of the houses where they eat the lambs.

8 That same night they are to eat the meat roasted over the fire, along with bitter herbs, and bread made without yeast.

9 Do not eat the meat raw or boiled in water, but roast it over a fire—with the head, legs and internal organs.

10 Do not leave any of it till morning; if some is left till morning, you must burn it.

11 This is how you are to eat it: with your cloak tucked into your belt, your sandals on your feet and your staff in your hand. Eat it in haste; it is the LORD’s Passover.

12 “On that same night I will pass through Egypt and strike down every firstborn of both people and animals, and I will bring judgment on all the gods of Egypt. I am the LORD.

13 The blood will be a sign for you on the houses where you are, and when I see the blood, I will pass over you. No destructive plague will touch you when I strike Egypt.

14 “This is a day you are to commemorate; for the generations to come you shall celebrate it as a festival to the LORD—a lasting ordinance.

15 For seven days you are to eat bread made without yeast. On the first day remove the yeast from your houses, for whoever eats anything with yeast in it from the first day through the seventh must be cut off from Israel.

16 On the first day hold a sacred assembly, and another one on the seventh day. Do no work at all on these days, except to prepare food for everyone to eat; that is all you may do.

17 “Celebrate the Festival of Unleavened Bread, because it was on this very day that I brought your divisions out of Egypt. Celebrate this day as a lasting ordinance for the generations to come.

18 In the first month you are to eat bread made without yeast, from the evening of the fourteenth day until the evening of the twenty-first day.

19 For seven days no yeast is to be found in your houses. And anyone, whether foreigner or native-born, who eats anything with yeast in it must be cut off from the community of Israel.

20 Eat nothing made with yeast. Wherever you live, you must eat unleavened bread.”

21 Then Moses summoned all the elders of Israel and said to them, “Go at once and select the animals for your families and slaughter the Passover lamb.

22 Take a bunch of hyssop, dip it into the blood in the basin and put some of the blood on the top and on both sides of the doorframe. None of you shall go out of the door of your house until morning.

23 When the LORD goes through the land to strike down the Egyptians, he will see the blood on the top and sides of the doorframe and will pass over that doorway, and he will not permit the destroyer to enter your houses and strike you down.

24 “Obey these instructions as a lasting ordinance for you and your descendants.

25 When you enter the land that the LORD will give you as he promised, observe this ceremony.

26 And when your children ask you, ‘What does this ceremony mean to you?’

27 then tell them, ‘It is the Passover sacrifice to the LORD, who passed over the houses of the Israelites in Egypt and spared our homes when he struck down the Egyptians.’ ” Then the people bowed down and worshiped.

28 The Israelites did just what the LORD commanded Moses and Aaron.

29 At midnight the LORD struck down all the firstborn in Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh, who sat on the throne, to the firstborn of the prisoner, who was in the dungeon, and the firstborn of all the livestock as well.

30 Pharaoh and all his officials and all the Egyptians got up during the night, and there was loud wailing in Egypt, for there was not a house without someone dead.

 

 

 

DIG:

Using your six friends: Who? What? When? Where? Why? And How? What do you find noteworthy about this Passover observance?

For example: when on the calendar is this event commemorated?

Why then?

How so?

What for?

What is the connection between blood and death in this passage?

Why is blood a good choice as a protection against death?

God surely could have accomplished the Exodus without the death of all the firstborn of the Egypt. So why do you think he chose to do it this way?

In what sense was this a judgement on all the gods of Egypt? (Vs 12)

Was this a wonder of God? (11:9)

Or perhaps you find any such killing altogether horrible?

What intent was this Passover event intended to have on the Pharoah?

On the Egyptians?

On the Hebrews?

On the future Israelites?

Do you think it succeeded?

For whose benefit does God institute this feast on the same night that he passes over the Egyptians?

What does the Jewish feast have in common with its Christian counterpart (Holy Communion)

REFLECT:

What are the gods or your culture?

Do you believe that the God of Israel is more powerful than they are?

How does he show his wondrous power?

How does this passage help you see the purpose of Jesus’ death & shed blood?

How do you remember the “Lamb that was slain (V 21, Rev 5:12)”

What part do ceremonies, such as communion or the Easter family meal, play in helping you remember what God has done for you?

How do you (or will) you keep these memories alive in your children?

Matthew Henry writes:

1. The paschal lamb was typical. Christ is our Passover, #1Co. 5:7 |. Christ is the Lamb of God, ( John 1:29 ) ; often in the Revelation he is called the Lamb. It was to be in its prime; Christ offered up himself in the midst of his days, not when a babe at Bethlehem. It was to be without blemish; the Lord Jesus was a Lamb without spot: the judge who condemned Christ declared him innocent. It was to be set apart four days before, denoting the marking out of the Lord Jesus to be a Saviour, both in the purpose and in the promise. It was to be slain, and roasted with fire, denoting the painful sufferings of the Lord Jesus, even unto death, the death of the cross. The wrath of God is as fire, and Christ was made a curse for us. Not a bone of it must be broken, which was fulfilled in Christ, Joh. 19:33 , denoting the unbroken strength of the Lord Jesus.

2. The sprinkling of the blood was typical. The blood of the lamb must be sprinkled, denoting the applying of the merits of Christ's death to our souls; we must receive the atonement, ( Romans 5:11 ) . Faith is the bunch of hyssop, by which we apply the promises, and the benefits of the blood of Christ laid up in them, to ourselves. It was to be sprinkled on the door-posts, denoting the open profession we are to make of faith in Christ. It was not to be sprinkled upon the threshold; which cautions us to take heed of trampling underfoot the blood of the covenant. It is precious blood, and must be precious to us. The blood, thus sprinkled, was a means of preserving the Israelites from the destroying angel, who had nothing to do where the blood was. The blood of Christ is the believer's protection from the wrath of God, the curse of the law, and the damnation of hell, ( Romans 8:1 ) .

3. The solemn eating of the lamb was typical of our gospel duty to Christ. The paschal lamb was not to be looked upon only, but to be fed upon. So we must by faith make Christ our own; and we must receive spiritual strength and nourishment from him, as from our food, see ( john 6:53 john 6:55 ) . It was all to be eaten; those who by faith feed upon Christ, must feed upon a whole Christ; they must take Christ and his yoke, Christ and his cross, as well as Christ and his crown. It was to be eaten at once, not put by till morning. Today Christ is offered, and is to be accepted while it is called today, before we sleep the sleep of death. It was to be eaten with bitter herbs, in remembrance of the bitterness of their bondage in Egypt; we must feed upon Christ with sorrow and brokenness of heart, in remembrance of sin. Christ will be sweet to us, if sin be bitter.

It was to be eaten standing, with their staves in their hands, as being ready to depart. When we feed upon Christ by faith, we must forsake the rule and the dominion of sin; sit loose to the world, and everything in it; forsake all for Christ, and reckon it no bad bargain, ( hebrews 13:13 hebrews 13:14 ) .

4. The feast of unleavened bread was ( 1 Corinthians. 5:7 ) Christ Jesus the Lord, we must continually delight ourselves in Christ Jesus. No manner of work must be done, that is, no care admitted and indulged, which does not agree with, or would lessen this holy joy. The Jews were very strict as to the Passover, so that no leaven should be found in their houses.

It must be a feast kept in charity, without the leaven of malice; and in sincerity, without the leaven of hypocrisy. It was by an ordinance forever; so long as we live, we must continue feeding upon Christ, rejoicing in him always, with thankful mention of the great things he has done for us.

Amen

 

 

CHURCH IS HAPPENING AS USUAL

Posted by [email protected] on July 19, 2020 at 12:00 AM Comments comments (0)

WE WILL BE HAVING CHURCH SERVICES AS USUAL AT OUR HOUSE at 669 VIllage way here in Willow Creek - 11am  Bring a lawn chair that you can sit in as we are outside.

If it is too cold or rainy outide, then we will go inside

Pastor Mike

NEW HOUSE CHURCH VIDEO

Posted by [email protected] on November 18, 2019 at 1:40 PM Comments comments (0)
AS WE ARE STARTING THE TRANSITION TO A HOUSE CHURCH IN JANUARY, THERE IS VIDEO WHICH I WOULD LIKE ALL OF YOU TO WATCH. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qheANo68eo HAVE FUN AND ASK QUESTIONS PASTOR MIKE

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